Sunday, May 27, 2012

My First Bird Nest

I know they're just robins, but after 5 years living here it's our first nest. Well, second. Cats ate the brown thrasher eggs, who had nested in a honeysuckle vine on the fence. Below, looks like we're missing a bird. Wonder if a blue jay got to an egg?



Mom was not happy happy with me on the ladder. She jumped from gutter to gutter, roof to roof, and I though that at any minute she'd land in my hair. I didn't have my hair done up today, so maybe that'd be ok, but still....

15 comments:

Julie Stone said...

Oh geez, that looks precarious! Fingers crossed for no downpours!

Congratulations by the way, Robins are excellent barometers of an ecosystem.

ProfessorRoush said...

I guess this is a time to hope for no rain....But I can't wish that on us for the sake of one nest. If it rains, I guess that's just a lesson from Darwin.

Mary Pellerito said...

I believe robins come back to the same nest every year, so you may need to build a mini tent over the nest. : )

Benjamin Vogt said...

They come back? It's finally to rain tonight, I hope, but I feel ok with the nest. She at least built it against that cross bar. I suppose the drowning threat is there vs. floating away. I didn't know robins were good env. indicators.

Gaia Gardener: said...

We're all keeping our fingers crossed that your rain is light! At least for a couple weeks until those sweeties fledge.

A few years ago I quit looking for nests. I've gotten to the point where, if I accidentally find one, I superstitiously look away from it in the future until I'm sure its occupants are gone. It seemed like every nest I found got raided and I began to feel that I was leading predators to the nest. (Of course, it was probably just that the nests I found were easy for predators to find, too.)

Benjamin Vogt said...

We need the rain BAD!!! Very dry. I do think the nest will be ok, but like you GG, I wonder if my looking at it spells doom. I am curious what happened to the third egg.

Kari L√łnning said...

I have a robin nesting in the wisteria right next to my front door. She gets SOOO started when I open the door, that I've had to use another door for the next week or two. (Beautiful photos.)

Benjamin Vogt said...

Kari--That's exactly where this nest is! Right out the front door. And we have an almost daily UPS man ring our door. The robin is most unhappy when people come with 20 feet.

Sandy Longhorn said...

Beautiful! We had 3 robin eggs, chicks, and fledglings in the tree outside my writing window last year. Fascinating to watch, especially when they left the tree...I was heartbroken by their struggles and sure they wouldn't make it. I saw two of the three as young juveniles, though, in the weeks following.

There really is nothing quite like that blue. Beautiful.

Corner Gardener Sue said...

Congratulations to the bird and human parents! I hope they thrive well.

Benjamin Vogt said...

Sandy--right outside your writing window? Love it! Lucky. I hope a poem came out of it.
Sue--We'll see, as the storm's a comin' in.

Donna@Gardens Eye View said...

Wonderful news! Why do they build these nests in the worst spots...robins returned to build the nest in the same tree and we expect to see babies later this week. The tree is a small willow right off the porch. Great viewing for fledging robins.

Sandy Longhorn said...

Well, so far only the empty nest has made it into a poem. Who knows about the baby birds? The memory is there, though, for when the poem is ready. :)

UrsulaV said...

Hatched chicks will sometimes kick an unhatched egg out of the nest, so as to maximize their share of resources. It's pretty normal to find a nest with fewer babies than eggs!

Benjamin Vogt said...

Donna--it's a good spot! A cross brace to keep the nest from floating away, and it's under another eave, actually.
Sandy--Ah yes, when the poem is ready. Patience is so key! Argh.
Ursula--I looked for egg bits but couldn't find one. Do blue jays run off with them?